Wisconsin’s ‘Parent Bill Of Rights’ Would Allow Parents To Sue Schools That Exploit Kids

The Wisconsin State Assembly and Senate have passed a “parent bill of rights” that would allow parents to sue schools that fail to inform them about their child’s gender or social transition, according to the bill.

The bill is sitting on the desk of Democratic Gov. Tony Evers, according to The Federalist. It mirrors bills advanced or alluded to in other states including Indiana, Texas, Kansas, Florida, Virginia, Missouri, and Georgia.

Wisconsin’s bill mandates that parents have “the right to review all medical records related to the child, unless specified otherwise in law or court order,” “the right to determine the names and pronouns used for the child while at school,” and “the right to review instructional materials and outlines used by the child’s school.”

According to the bill text, parents are allowed to sue governmental bodies or school officials if they violate the rights of parents or usurp “the fundamental right of a parent or guardian to direct the upbringing, education, health care, and mental health of a child.”

Screenshot/https://docs.legis.wisconsin.gov/2021/related/enrolled/ab963

The law was drafted after a Wisconsin school district was sued for allegedly concealing information on a child’s gender transition from the child’s parents. Parents filed a lawsuit against the Kettle Moraine School District after their 12-year-old daughter began a “social transition” wherein she was “presenting to others as the opposite sex, primarily by adopting a new name and pronouns,” the Daily Caller News Foundation reported.

“The Kettle Moraine School District has a policy, whether written or unwritten, allowing minor students to socially transition to a different gender identity at school without parental consent, and even over the parents’ objection,” the complaint read.

A separate Wisconsin school district told educators that parents are not “entitled to know their kids’ identities.” (RELATED: Wisconsin Teacher Training: ‘Parents Are Not Entitled To Know Their Kids’ Identities’)

Wisconsin mothers also reported that children as young as five years old can access porn websites and “inappropriate content” on their school iPads.



Chrissy Clark