Filipovic claimed men with stay-at-home wives are more sexist

Jill Filipovic asserted in a tweet on Tuesday that men who have stay-at-home wives are more sexist compared to husbands whose wives work a job.

“More mothers at home makes for worse, more sexist men who see women as mommies and helpmeets. Men with stay-at-home wives are more sexist than men with working wives; they don’t assess women’s workplace contributions fairy; and they are less likely to hire and promote women,” tweeted Filipovic, who says in her Twitter biography that she is a writer, lawyer, and author.

Many women find fulfillment by choosing to be a stay-at-home mom. Unsurprisingly, Filipovic’s comments lead to pushback from people on Twitter.

Kimberly Ross tweeted, “…And here I was, excited to leave FT employment outside the home to become a SAHM (by choice!) who also writes on the side. It was and continues to be a great decision for me and my family. I absolutely do not regret it.”


“I see my wife as a mother (among other things.) I think that job is a thousand times more difficult and more important than writing a substack. But apparently that makes me sexist,” National Review senior writer David Harsanyi tweeted.

“My husband is a VP at a bank and hires and promotes women all the time. I have been a SAHM for 31 years and none of what you say is true,” another person tweeted.

“My husband is far from sexist and I am joyed with this life the Lord has given me. Women are *nothing more* than an easy to replace number in the working world. At home, they are someone’s world. They are irreplaceable. More moms at home creates a healthier & stronger society,” someone else tweeted.

“She got all wrong. It’s a JOY to be a homemaker & serve my husband, but again these people don’t know the Lord. God created women to be a helpmate and it says in Titus 2 that women are the keeper of the home. Culture does not rewrite the bible. And my husband is far from sexist,” another individual tweeted.

Filipovic also said that moms who have jobs fare better emotionally and psychologically than women who opt to stay at home.

“Stay-at-home mothers are psychologically and emotionally worse off than working mothers by just about every measure, from depression to anxiety to anger; they are much more likely than working mothers to say that they are struggling, and less likely to say that they are thriving,” she tweeted.




Alex Nitzberg